Commercial Loans – Take All Aspects In Consideration

As the saying goes, taking a loan is easier than surviving with it. A shrewd businessman is one who borrow but with an eye to repay it as soon as possible. Sometimes, business requirements arise because you get a new business order hat is hard to manage within your own business funds. You obviously cannot afford to lose big business opportunity only because the funds are not there.

These and other similar situations force you to take help of external sources of financing. These sources may be temporary or permanent, depending on the nature of funding. Large body corporate often have huge financial needs, and therefore, they resort to public financing by inviting deposits or going for a ‘rights issue’ meant for the existing shareholders. On the other hand, a new business concern or sole proprietorship undertaking would obviously not be able to take benefit of that sort – neither are these meant for them.

Before applying for commercial loans, first of all decide the type of debt financing that your business firm will be comfortably able to get. If you do not own any property in the name of firm, secured commercial business loans are out of question. You will have to rely on loans that do not require any security. These loans will offer you a limited amount – upto £25,000. The interest rate is likely to be little more than what you can get by pledging some property. The amount of loan that you can qualify for can be increased by involving some property in the loan transaction.

Niche Marketing Strategy – For Your Online Business

There are several considerations worth discussing when we delve into the issue of niche marketing. Firstly, let’s discuss the importance of establishing a niche.

In reality, some of us Internet Marketers are already marketing products in specific niches but with little or no success. While choosing a niche is key, primarily to keep our business in focus, sometimes Internet Marketers are drawn to promote products in which they have no interest in or have no knowledge about.

So why do they do it in the first place? It begs the question that they choose to promote such products simply because they found these products to be in ‘high demand’. They hold this notion that once they put out these products for promotion online, then there would be throngs of customers clamoring for the products.

The Ideal

Balancing niches in demand with one’s interest is certainly not as straightforward as we would like it to be. But it is definitely ideal. Why?

This is so as to ease the marketing efforts in promoting the chosen products. Let me add that this is especially so if one is using article marketing as a tool to promote his products.

As an illustration, let’s say that one has chosen to promote products in the homewares or kitchen tools niche. It so happens that this person is a juice fanatic, who simply can’t resist juicing even for a day. If he could find a juicer worth promoting in his online business, then he’s looking at a potentially lucrative future, simply because he could provide relevant information to his prospects on what the juicer(s) can do. Since he juices daily and presumably own several juices during his time, he would be in an apt position to recommend appropriate ones for users’ differing needs.

Thus, the bottomline for success in one’s niche marketing strategy is to integrate the knowledge of products in high demand with his genuine interest in those products.

Another Important Consideration

Choosing niches in demand, we must also look for products with low competition to promote. For instance, many Internet Marketers choose to promote online marketing-related products just because they use the Internet as a medium for promotion.

As in the above example, products in the kitchen tools niche can be a sound choice. I read about an Internet Marketer whose forte is in micro niches and who seasonally promotes Halloween-related products as part of her online portfolio.

Launching A Brand At The Super Bowl With “Dreadful” Packaging

I picked this up on the news this week and was interested to hear Ad Age critic Bob Garfield’s take on the Super Bowl ad for American Home Health. Although he loved the ad, he hated the packaging and in most cases the packaging is what will sell the product — or not.

This is a direct quote about the product and packaging. “You can go to great lengths to prevent germs wearing a biohazard suit 24/7 or you can use the new PS line of disinfectants. A solid product intro despite dreadful packaging and logotype.”

With each Super Bowl 30-second time slot costing a record $2.5 million – or $83,333 per second, you would think the company would have all their ducks (not AFLAC) in a row when it comes to product packaging. I remember the American Home Health ad, but I was more focused on the green biohazard suits so I went back and looked at the products.

The message I got from a brief glimpse of the packaging was “industrial strength.” I like the strong color family concept but the colors themselves come across as harsh and the package looks rather mundane, “institutionalized” and definitely not consumer oriented. This might have been the company’s strategy to give the product the industrial strength look equating to a better stronger product. In that case, they got their message across. We will wait to see how the packaging evolves after it has been on the market and in the consumers hands for a while.

Another ad where the package was the supposed star of the show, Pepsi Light, got panned by a media critic too. “The session features a group of men and women moaning and flirting with the can of Pepsi on a pedestal to the tune of “You want it.” No thanks. Brown and bubbly…bad and burpy. Hardly appetizing.” Other media pundits also gave this ad thumbs down.

This sends a bad message to the packaging community, no matter how strongly the product is branded. I watched the commercial and didn’t get the point either.

So, spend some time and think about the perception of your package with a new product launch and analyze the cost of prime time advertising. What will the consumer see in your product? Will the first impression be a good one or a negative one that will have to be overcome at a later date? Does the package invite the consumer to come for a closer look? Remember, the best advertising will fail the test if the consumer doesn’t like the look of the product when they see it for themselves. With the right packaging, you can brand your product positively in the consumer’s eyes. Conversely, with the wrong packaging you can establish a lasting negative impression that can never be overcome.