How to Test Your Info Product Ideas Before Launching Them!

Testing your info products before you actually spend time and money promoting them is essential, as it will save you a lot of wasted time, effort and money in the long-run.You may have and all the research in the world, but until actually go and test your products you’ll never know whether they are truly going to make you any money on not.One of the quickest way to test a product is by setting up a simple PPC campaign (preferably with Google AdWords).Make sure you pick the most targeted keywords which you can think of, and send traffic to your sales page to see how many orders you take.You don’t even have to do create a full product either. You can simply monitor how many people click the order button.If people actually do click the order button, you can send them to a secondary page which explains that the product is not yet available… but it’s coming soon.This also gives you the chance to collect their details so that you can follow up with them once the product is ready. Another way you can test your product quickly, is by releasing it to your target audience for free. You can do this by offering it in related forums to your market, and asking for feedback.This will at least give you an idea of whether you are on track or not. you can also ask them what is missing, or what they would like to see included.This is the best type of feedback you can get, because these are your target audience and the same sort people who will actually end up buying a product in the future.By carrying out these simple tests, you can check to see whether your product is something that your market is likely to buy, before you spend all that time and money developing a product and promoting it… only to find out that people don’t want to buy it!It may seem like another hurdle or step which you’d rather not do, but what you have to ask yourself is whether you would prefer to take this step and save yourself six months of hard work and wasted money, or jump right in and pray that people will hopefully buy your product by lucky chance.

Info Product Creation: Process Steps

The process of creating an info product is very similar to the process of creating any other product but with some subtle differences. The main difference is that it’s almost certainly you that are going to be most affected by the success (or otherwise) of the product but that it’s very easy to become attached to a product idea and bury your head in the sand when everyone else tells you that it’s a dud. Follow these simple process steps to maximise the chance of creating a successful product.

1. Research

Your research doesn’t have to be extensive but it does have to take place.

Check whether there’s likely to be demand for the product you want to produce – read forums, look in places like Yahoo Answers, check Amazon, that kind of thing.

2. Is it a want or a need?

Wants are much stronger than needs.

Most of us don’t need an iPhone or the latest big screen television with cinema quality sound. But most of us want them!

Contrast that with 3-D televisions where the only people who want those seem to be the television producers – demand has been weak at best because most of us don’t want to have to sit in front of a television wearing weird glasses.

3. What’s it going to contain?

Before you start creating your new info product, you need to know what’s going to be included.

Make an outline for your proposed product.

An outline makes it easy to spot anything you’ve missed and include it before you get to the production stage for your info product. I find the best way to spot the kind of glaring omissions that often occur in products is to produce the outline and then set it aside – preferably overnight – before coming back to it with fresh eyes.

4. Start producing

Whether your info product is software, a PDF, videos or anything else, it needs to be produced!

Depending on the length of your product, you may produce it in a handful of sessions or it may take longer. But if you don’t start producing it, nothing is going to show for your initial planning work.

5. Edit your product

It pays to go back over your product and edit it.

Check for typos if it’s a PDF. Double check that your personal login details aren’t shown if it’s a video. Debug it if you’ve produced software of some sort. Whatever it takes to make sure that your product is ready to be launched.

6. Create a sales page and a download page

It’s unlikely that your sales page can just be “Buy my product”.

The chances are that you’ll need to persuade people to purchase and that’s the job of the sales page.

Let your voice come through on the page. And learn to tread the fine line between being a pushy salesman that everyone wants to avoid and not pushing hard enough.

A story often works well – people can identify with it and we drop our guard when stories are told.

7. Start promoting

You need to let the world know that your new product exists.

You could have the best product and the best sales letter but without promotion, your product will just be another page on the internet, buried amongst millions of other pages.

So make sure to set aside some time to promote your new product and give it the best possible chance of success.

Launching A Brand At The Super Bowl With “Dreadful” Packaging

I picked this up on the news this week and was interested to hear Ad Age critic Bob Garfield’s take on the Super Bowl ad for American Home Health. Although he loved the ad, he hated the packaging and in most cases the packaging is what will sell the product — or not.

This is a direct quote about the product and packaging. “You can go to great lengths to prevent germs wearing a biohazard suit 24/7 or you can use the new PS line of disinfectants. A solid product intro despite dreadful packaging and logotype.”

With each Super Bowl 30-second time slot costing a record $2.5 million – or $83,333 per second, you would think the company would have all their ducks (not AFLAC) in a row when it comes to product packaging. I remember the American Home Health ad, but I was more focused on the green biohazard suits so I went back and looked at the products.

The message I got from a brief glimpse of the packaging was “industrial strength.” I like the strong color family concept but the colors themselves come across as harsh and the package looks rather mundane, “institutionalized” and definitely not consumer oriented. This might have been the company’s strategy to give the product the industrial strength look equating to a better stronger product. In that case, they got their message across. We will wait to see how the packaging evolves after it has been on the market and in the consumers hands for a while.

Another ad where the package was the supposed star of the show, Pepsi Light, got panned by a media critic too. “The session features a group of men and women moaning and flirting with the can of Pepsi on a pedestal to the tune of “You want it.” No thanks. Brown and bubbly…bad and burpy. Hardly appetizing.” Other media pundits also gave this ad thumbs down.

This sends a bad message to the packaging community, no matter how strongly the product is branded. I watched the commercial and didn’t get the point either.

So, spend some time and think about the perception of your package with a new product launch and analyze the cost of prime time advertising. What will the consumer see in your product? Will the first impression be a good one or a negative one that will have to be overcome at a later date? Does the package invite the consumer to come for a closer look? Remember, the best advertising will fail the test if the consumer doesn’t like the look of the product when they see it for themselves. With the right packaging, you can brand your product positively in the consumer’s eyes. Conversely, with the wrong packaging you can establish a lasting negative impression that can never be overcome.